Lehrstuhl für Historische und Indogermanische Sprachwissenschaft
print

Links und Funktionen

Navigationspfad


Inhaltsbereich

Brill's Studies in Indo-European Languages & Linguistics

Band 18

Language and Meter. Edited by Olav Hackstein and Dieter Gunkel. Leiden 2018

In Language and Meter, Dieter Gunkel and Olav Hackstein unite fifteen linguistic studies on a variety of poetic traditions, including the Homeric epics, the hieratic hymns of the Ṛgveda, the Gathas of the Avesta, early Latin and the Sabellic compositions, Germanic alliterative verse, Insular Celtic court poetry, and Tocharian metrical texts. The studies treat a broad range of topics, including the prehistory of the hexameter, the nature of Homeric formulae, the structure of Vedic verse, rhythm in the Gathas, and the relationship between Germanic and Celtic poetic traditions. The volume contributes to our understanding of the relationship between language and poetic form, and how they change over time.

Band 17

Jay H. Jasanoff: The Prehistory of the Balto-Slavic Accent. Leiden 2017

The Prehistory of the Balto-Slavic Accent has been written to fill a gap. The interested non-specialist can easily learn about the complex accent systems of the individual Baltic and Slavic languages and how they relate to each other. But the reader interested in the Proto-Balto-Slavic parent system, and how it evolved from the very different system of Proto-Indo-European, has few reliable places to turn. The goal of this book is to provide an accentological interface between Indo-European and Balto-Slavic—to identify and explain the accent shifts and other early changes that give the earliest stages of Baltic and Slavic their distinctive prosodic cast.

Band 16

David Goldstein: Classical Greek Syntax. Wackernagel's Law in Herodotus. Leiden 2016

In Classical Greek Syntax: Wackernagel's Law in Herodotus, David Goldstein offers the first theoretically-informed study of second-position clitics in Ancient Greek and challenges the long-standing belief that Greek word order is ‟free” or beyond the reach of systematic analysis. On the basis of Herodotus’ Histories, he demonstrates that there are in fact systematic correspondences between clause structure and meaning. Crucial to this new model of the Greek clause is Wackernagel’s Law, the generalization that enclitics and postpositives occur in ‟second position,” as these classes of words provide a stable anchor for analyzing sentence structure. The results of this work not only restore word order as an interpretive dimension of Greek texts, but also provide a framework for the investigation of other areas of syntax in Greek, as well as archaic Indo-European more broadly.

Band 15

Andrew Miles Byrd: The Indo-European Syllable. Leiden 2015

In The Indo-European Syllable Andrew Miles Byrd investigates the process of syllabification within Proto-Indo-European (PIE), revealing connections to a number of seemingly unrelated phonological processes in the proto-language.
Drawing from insights in linguistic typology and synchronic theory, he makes two significant advances in our understanding of PIE phonology. First, by analyzing securely reconstructable consonant clusters at word’s edge, he devises a methodology which allows us to predict which types of consonant clusters could occur word-medially in PIE. Thus, a number of previously disconnected phonological rules can now be understood as being part of a conspiracy motivated by violations in syllable structure. Second, he uncovers evidence of morphological influence within the syllable, created by processes such as quantitative ablaut. These advances allow us to view PIE as a synchronic grammar, one which can be described by -- and contribute to -- modern linguistic theory.

Band 14

Thomas Olander: Proto-Slavic Inflectional Morphology. A Comparative Handbook. 411 S. Leiden 2015

Proto-Slavic, the reconstructed ancestor of the Slavic languages, presents a rich inflectional system inherited from Proto-Indo-European. In this handbook all the inflectional endings of Proto-Slavic are traced back to Proto-Indo-European through a systematic comparison with the corresponding forms in related languages.
Applying a redefinition of Proto-Slavic based on prehistoric loanword relations with neighbouring non-Slavic languages, Thomas Olander provides a new look at the Proto-Slavic inflectional system. The systematic, coherent and exhaustive approach laid out in the handbook paves the way for new solutions to long-standing problems of Slavic historical grammar.

Band 13

Adam I. Cooper: Reconciling Indo-European Syllabification. 383 S. Leiden 2015

In Reconciling Indo-European Syllabification, Adam Cooper brings together two seemingly disparate phenomena associated with Indo-European syllable structure: the heterosyllabic treatment of medial consonant clusters, which tolerates CVC syllables, and the right-hand vocalization of sonorants, which ostensibly avoids them. Operating from a perspective that is simultaneously empirical, theoretical, and historical in nature, he establishes their compatibility by crafting a formal analysis that integrates them into a single picture of the reconstructed system.
More generally, drawing on evidence from Vedic, Greek, and Proto-Indo-European itself, Cooper demonstrates the continued relevance of the ancient Indo-European languages to contemporary linguistic theory, and, moreover, reaffirms the value of the syllable as a unit of phonology, necessary for these languages’ formal representation.

Band 12

Anna H. Bauer: Morphosyntax of the Noun Phrase in Hieroglyphic Luwian. 340 S. Leiden 2014

In The Morphosyntax of the Noun Phrase in Hieroglyphic Luwian Anna H. Bauer provides a full and detailed account of the noun phrases in Hieroglyphic Luwian, an Anatolian language attested mainly in inscriptions from the first millennium BC. The available material is analysed according to the different elements found in the NP, and a chapter each is devoted to determination, quantification, modification and apposition.
Along with discussing the structures from a synchronic point of view, Anna Bauer also draws parallels to neighbouring languages and ongoing changes within HLuwian itself. It is shown how other languages have left their mark on HLuwian and how that influences the HLuwian system.

Band 11

Studies on the Collective and Feminine in Indo-European from a Diachronic and Typological Perspective. Edited by Sergio Neri and Roland Schuhmann. 382 S. Leiden 2014

This volume contains thirteen contributions on the origin of the feminine gender and its relation to the collective in the Indo-European parent language. The Indo-European daughter languages have got mostly a three-gender system, however the early attested Anatolian languages owned only two genders. In this respect, it is debatable whether the feminine gender is primary or arose secondarily from another morphological category. Due to special morphological and morphosyntactic phenomena it is also questionable whether the neuter plural of the individual languages continues an inflectional category or it was rather grammaticalized from an original word formation category collective. The authors suggest different approaches on the question of the relationship between feminine and collective.

Band 10

Katsiaryna Ackermann: Die Vorgeschichte des slavischen Aoristsystems mit der kommentierten Belegsammlung der Aoristformen und Formen des präteritalen passiven Partizipiums im Altkirchenslavischen. 400 S. Leiden 2014

Die Vorgeschichte des slavischen Aoristsystems proposes a new look on the paradigmatic organization of the finite verb in Proto-Slavic. It rests on the study of the diachronic and synchronic conditioning of paradigmatic preferences of Proto-Slavic primary verbs and is shown to account for the complementary distribution of partially syncretistic aorist stem formations into six classes (bases of the systematic description adopted here). Major development trends reveal clear parallels with other Indo-European branches. Along with the discussion of paradigmatic constellations, diachronic background, etymology and grammar, the work comprises a nearly complete attestation of aorists and past participles of primary verbs including prefixal compounds in canonic OCS and those outside the canon, and is designed as an extensive reference book both for Indo-Europeanists and Slavists.

Band 9

Götz Keydana: Infinitive im R̥gveda: Formen, Funktion, Diachronie. 394 S. Leiden 2013

Infinitive im R̥gveda is an in-depth study of infinitives in Early Vedic, the language of the R̥gveda. Infinitives in Vedic have been studied from various perspectives. This book, however, is the first to give a detailed account of the full range of the attested morphological, syntactic, and semantic types. Based on insights from formal semantics and syntactic theory, the author gives explicit analyses for each type, paying special attention to the grammatical functions involved and to the control relations which govern the reference of subjects in infinitive phrases. On a more general level, the book provides a framework for historical syntax and heuristics for studying syntactic categories in ancient languages.

Infinitive im R̥gveda wirft einen frischen Blick auf die umstrittene Kategorie Infinitiv im frühen Vedisch, der Sprache des R̥gveda. Unter Berücksichtigung von Methoden und Erkenntnissen der Syntaxtheorie und der formalen Semantik wird die gesamte Bandbreite der belegten morphologischen Kodierungen, der syntaktischen Verwendungen und ihrer Semantik herausgearbeitet und ausführlich dokumentiert.

Band 8

Michaël Peyrot: The Tocharian Subjunctive. 886 S. Leiden 2013

As one of the most central categories of the Tocharian verb, the subjunctive is of utmost importance for the reconstruction of the verbal system, the most rewarding domain of Tocharian historical grammar. Michaël Peyrot provides a thorough analysis of the formation of the subjunctive in both Tocharian languages, and establishes its meaning on the basis of a systematic investigation of a wealth of published and unpublished texts. A careful reconstruction of the Proto-Tocharian stage provides a solid base for the comparison with Indo-European and the derivation of the Tocharian subjunctive from the proto-language. With its focus on the wide variety of intricate morphological patterns, The Tocharian Subjunctive is at the same time a study of the whole Tocharian verbal system.

Band 7

Nicholas Zair: The Reflexes of the Proto-Indo-European Laryngeals in Celtic. 346 S. Leiden 2012

In The Reflexes of the Proto-Indo-European Laryngeals in Celtic, Nicholas Zair for the first time collects and assesses all the words from the Celtic languages which contained a laryngeal, and identifies the regular results of the laryngeals in each phonetic environment. This allows him to formulate previously unrecognised sound changes affecting Proto-Celtic, and assess the competing explanations for other developments. This work has far-reaching consequences for the understanding of the historical phonology and morphology of the Celtic languages, and for etymological work involving the Celtic language, along with implications for Indo-European sound laws and the Indo-European syllable. A major conclusion is that the laryngeals cannot be used to argue for an Italo-Celtic language family.

Band 6

Emmanuel Dupraz: Sabellian Demonstratives. 372 S. Leiden 2011

Past research on the Sabellian languages has been devoted mainly to the phonetic and morphological features of these languages as elements for the reconstruction of the prehistoric stages of Latin. The present book aims at analysing the semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic features of a subset of grammatical terms, the demonstratives. It contains a thorough description of their synchronic behaviour, which permits both a comparison to the Latin data with new hypotheses on the epigraphic genres in Republican Italy and a reconstruction of the Italic origins of these terms based on typological principles. Neither the grammar of Sabellian nor the pragmatic scope of the Sabellian inscriptions should be considered a priori identical to their Latin comparanda.

Band 5

Eystein Dahl: Exploring Inflectional Semantics in the Rigveda. 474 S. Leiden 2010

This book takes a fresh look at the relationship between aspect, tense and mood in Early Vedic, the language of the Rigveda. Although numerous studies have examined the functional range of individual verbal categories in this language, this work is the first attempt to approach this problem from an overall, systemic perspective. With insights from formal semantics and linguistic typology, the author demonstrates that aspect represents a grammatically relevant semantic dimension on a par with tense in the Early Vedic verbal system, thereby indicating that the language has preserved an aspectual opposition similar to the one found in Homeric Greek. Apart from these general findings, the book provides a theoretical framework designed for exploring inflectional semantics in dead languages.

Band 4

Daniel Petit: Untersuchungen zu den baltischen Sprachen. 353 S. Leiden 2010

The Baltic languages (Lithuanian, Latvian, Old Prussian) are well known for their archaic structure, but their contribution to Indo-European linguistics has hitherto often been underestimated. The aim of this book is to give a thorough survey of some of the major issues of Baltic linguistics. It consists of five chapters, devoted, respectively, to the problems of Baltic dialectology, to the development of the Baltic accentual system, to the fate of the neuter gender in Baltic, to the reconstruction of the Baltic verbal system and, finally, to the syntax of clitic forms in Baltic.

Band 3

Melanie Malzahn: The Tocharian Verbal System. 1076 S. Leiden 2010

This book presents a synchronic and diachronic study of all verbal classes and categories of the Tocharian branch of Indo-European. It lists all attested Tocharian verbal forms, together with semantic and etymological information. The material has been subject to careful philological evaluation and incorporates unedited or unpublished texts of the Berlin, London, and Paris collections. In addition, this study consistently takes into account the linguistic variation within the Tocharian B language and the relative chronology of texts. Moreover, Tocharian offers crucial evidence for the reconstruction of the PIE verbal system, and is also of interest to the general linguist for the interaction of voice and valency.

Band 2

Ilya Yakubovich: Sociolinguistics of the Luvian Language. 456 S. Leiden 2010.

Luvian is the language of Anatolian hieroglyphic inscriptions and a close relative of Hittite. This book explores the Luvian ethnic history through sociolinguistic methods, with an emphasis on the interpretation of contacts between Luvian and its linguistic neighbors, such as Hittite, Hurrian, and Greek. It is concluded that Luvian was originally spoken in the central part of Anatolia. Subsequent Luvian migrations were connected with the expansion of the Hittite state, where Hittite was the socially dominant language, but the Luvian speakers were more numerous. The unstable balance between the Hittite and the Luvian speakers continued to shift in favor of the second group, to the point that the Hittite elites were fully bilingual in Luvian.

Band 1

Michael Weiss: Language and Ritual in Sabellic Italy. The Ritual Complex of the Third and Fourth Tabulae Iguvinae. 516 S. Leiden 2010

The Iguvine Tables (Tabulae Iguvinae) are among the most invaluable documents of Italic linguistics and religion. Seven bronze tablets discovered in 1444 in the Umbrian town of Gubbio (ancient Iguvium), they record the rites and sacral laws of a priestly brotherhood, the Fratres Atiedii, with a degree of detail unparalleled elsewhere in ancient Italy. Taking an interdisciplinary approach that combines philological and linguistic, as well as ritual analysis, Michael Weiss not only addresses the many interpretive cruces that have puzzled scholars for a century and a half, but also constructs a coherent theory of the entire ritual performance described on Tables III and IV. In addition, Weiss sheds light on many questions of Roman ritual practice and places the Iguvine Tables in their broader Italic and Indo-European contexts.

Hier gelangen Sie zur Verlags-Seite der Brill's Studies in Indo-European Languages & Linguistics:

Zur Verlags-Seite